Caring for an aging or ill loved one is an important responsibility, but it can also be extremely challenging and emotionally draining. As a caregiver, it’s important that you take care of yourself and maintain your physical and mental health so you can support your loved one and those who depend on you. By taking advantage of online resources and communities, you can find support, learn from others’ experiences, and gain insight into how to navigate the caregiving journey.

  • The Caregiver Space creates a safe and open environment for caregivers to receive comfort and support. People who are various stages of caregiving can use this space to share their experiences, ask questions, and talk to others about their journey.
  • Caregiver Stress offers training, resources, advice, and helpful tips for a variety of caregiver and senior care topics. Focus areas include self-care while caregiving, caring for a loved one with dementia, end of life care, financial issues, and more.
  • The Caregivers’ Living Room is a blog by Donna Thomson, author and caregiver to her son Nicholas who has severe disabilities. Her blog was rated one of the top fifty caregiver blogs to follow in 2018 and addresses topics such as practical solutions for family caregivers, eldercare, and disability parenting.
  • Michelle Seitzer’s blog, Caregiving Advice, offers resources and tips for people at varying stages of caregiving. As someone who was close with her grandparents and previously worked in healthcare, Michelle writes from personal and professional experience to provide readers with elder care consulting, coaching, and more.
  • Ranked as one of the top five websites for caregivers, Daily Caring offers practical answers and easy-to-find solutions to address day-to-day issues that family caregivers may face. Daily Caring’s resources include helpful tips, advice, and personal stories to make navigating elder care less challenging.
  • Graying with Grace is an elder care resource site run by Scott Grant, a rehabilitation technology supplier for a medical equipment company. Through his job, Scott has extensive experience in working with aging adults as their mobility declines. His site offers suggestions to increase independence for seniors who face limited mobility.
  • Shelley Webb originally created The Intentional Caregiver to collect resources that she found helpful as she cared for her aging father. Through her personal and professional experience, Shelley created a network of experts that provide support and strategies for navigating elder care and finding joy in the caregiving journey.
  • Senior.com is an online community for seniors to help them stay in their homes for as long as possible. This site offers information, product suggestions, and services to address the needs of aging adults.
  • Today’s Caregiver started in 1995 as the nation’s first magazine dedicated to caregivers. Now, the site is home to helpful tips, community discussion boards, a weekly newsletter, and breaking news related to elder care and caregiving. This organization also hosts trainings and caregiving conferences across the country.
  • Molly LeGrand started The Upside to Aging to share her insight into overcoming the challenges of taking care of an aging loved one and having a more positive outlook on the caregiving journey. Her blog offers information to promote having healthy and happy relationships with seniors who depend on you.

National Organizations and Community Resources

In addition to the caregiving resources listed, there are national associations that coordinate with local and federal governments to provide community resources for aging adults.

  • The National Alliance for Caregiving aims to improve the quality of life for family caregivers through research, advocacy, and innovation. The organization has many resources available online and releases weekly newsletters to share their insights with their caregiving community.
  • The National Association for Area Agencies on Aging aims to help aging adults and people with disabilities remain in their homes or communities for as long as possible and maintain dignity and independence through the aging process. To learn more about Area Agencies on Aging, read our blog post.
  • The National PACE Association supports PACE organizations across the country. PACE organizations coordinate preventive, primary, acute, and long-term care services for aging adults to enable them to maintain independence and stay in their homes or communities for as long as possible. To learn more about PACE organizations, read our blog post.

Download this information as a PDF: Elder Care and Caregiving Resources